Food, clothing, accessories – what to take in a tent?

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Food, clothing, accessories – what to take in a tent?
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Changing clothes in case of inclement weather or damage is a must while camping. You’ll also need to bring the right accessories with you so you can dress wounds, provide light, or avoid getting lost in the wilderness.

Sleeping bag

Sleeping under the stars will be much more comfortable if you carry a waterproof, season-appropriate sleeping bag. In fact, sometimes trying to camp without one that will keep you adequately warm is downright dangerous. Invest in a copy that is lightweight, durable and easy to clean.

A pocket knife and lighter

This is the best all-purpose tool that you can take with you anywhere, especially into the woods and other wilder areas. With a knife you can cut a rope, cut a fishing line, dice bait, slice cheese or sausage (and it’s worth ordering from https://paczkazrusiborza.pl/), open a sealed package, sharpen a stick, deal with tangled vines, tighten a screw, etc. Without a knife such tasks become almost impossible. If you leave this valuable tool at home, expect frequent frustration and unnecessary stress

In addition to the pocket knife, it is worth to have a lighter, which is invaluable in the wilderness (after all, you won’t light a fire with a flint). You can buy a simple one for about 3 zlotys in most grocery stores, or get something more expensive, for example from Zippo. If you do buy the more expensive option, consider buying fuel, which is gasoline for Zippo lighters.

Photo by Uriel Mont/Pexels

First Aid Kit

Things can go wrong during a camping trip. Be prepared for blisters, splinters, cuts and other wounds with a well-stocked first aid kit. Keep a first aid kit in your backpack so you can pull it out in case of an emergency.

Solar phone charger

Needless to say, you won’t find many electrical outlets outdoors. This solar charger with USB connection can charge your phone, camera or other device just by the power of the sun. This waterproof device clips to your backpack, so it absorbs sunlight while you hike. It can charge your smartphone up to 5 times.

Containers

If you want to be able to easily find things in your backpack, tent, or car, you’ll definitely need a set of high-quality packing containers. Instead of sifting through everything you’ve packed to see if there’s a single pair of clean underwear, simply pull out the box that contains your underwear.

You should, of course, pack your underwear and other clothing in containers, and these ones by Octagon are especially noteworthy.

LifeStraw Water Bottle

It’s very important to take a high-quality, reusable water bottle with you when camping. You can refill it at the taps at your campsite without worrying about how clean its source is, as it removes 99.99% of contaminants that would otherwise make you sick. You can even safely collect water straight from a stream or river.

Solar lantern

A solar lantern is great because it doesn’t require replacing batteries or a power source. The foldable one in particular is worth considering. This is because it is easy to pack, and some models can be very bright. In addition, it is light enough to carry with you and hang in your tent for indoor lighting.

Foot Balm

When you’re camping, you’ll be doing a lot of walking and will probably go on a hike that puts extra pressure on your feet. To prevent blisters, take this blister lotion with you and the problem will be less of a nuisance or eliminated altogether. It applies quickly and lasts most of the day, simply by stopping the excessive friction that causes blisters.

GPS/map and compass

If your camping plan calls for hiking in remote areas, don’t leave without a map and compass or GPS. Constant changes in the sun’s position can make forest landmarks seem unfamiliar, causing hikers to become disoriented. Unprepared campers have sometimes wandered in the woods for days before being rescued or finding their way back to camp. Getting lost or stranded in a wooded area, especially with limited access to water, is very dangerous

Toilet paper

Die-hard survivalists may view toilet paper as an unnecessary luxury in the outdoors, but many vacationers consider it a necessity. Bark and leaves are poor substitutes for a latrine, both in terms of comfort and hygiene. It is also known that campsites with bathrooms will sometimes run out of paper. If you’re camping in the deep woods and are concerned about eco-friendliness, buy the kind of paper that is biodegradable or take a trash bag for disposal.

Photo by Sayan Nath/Unsplash

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